Guest Post: ‘Youth Leader: you are worth investing in!’

Youth leader, did you know you were worth investing in?

In this important post, Andy Wilson from Roll the Rock, discusses the issues that might arise if youth workers are not invested in, and also suggests how there is a pay off from investing a youthworker in how they are able to thrive in developing and connecting with young people. 

So much of social media asks for investment into work, investment into resources, and money for all sorts of things, but why is it we ask for the money, but neglect the leader/leaders who will be taking care of the budget and the teams?  surely if we are to see a longterm investment in young people, we need to see a long-term investment into those people who are leading!

There still does appear to be an understanding, or an opinion that the youth leader is there as a leader, and therefore needs to get on and do what they are meant to do!  Expectations run high from many people in terms of working with young people, but who asks the questions of how the youth leader is? How are they emotionally? When are they resting? How are they coping? who blesses, or treats the youth leader, and in very simple terms, ensures that they are valued and doing ok in their roll?

it is true to say that youth leaders are able to stay in their role for longer now, than maybe has been the case for a while, but the pressures remain, the expectations remain, the questions remain, and the mental battles, spiritual struggles, emotional weaknesses all still remain and are what the youth leader lives with, with so much of their life.

surely it is time, for the Church, to recognise those who have been in youth work for some considerable time, understood the context of the work, and are able to speak into, and share in the struggles of the youth leader, and release them into a roll of coaching, supporting, mentoring for those leaders around them?  But not only is it important for the Church to recognise the need for these kind of people in youth leaders lives, but it is also important for youth leaders to recognise the importance of having someone like this in their life?  As people start out on the youth work journey, it is often seen as an exciting adventure, a powerful position, and a place to enjoy, but sometimes there can also be that feeling, of “I have made it”, and not needing anyone else around us, to support, or ask the questions!  Image result for mentor

Investment should be seen as a positive thing, a valuing thing, a supportive thing, that enables longevity, and flourishing for the youth leader.  They are not just meant to survive, but thrive in who they are, and what they do.

Investment in them for who they are, recognises them first, and strengthens their identity, which has to come first, before what they do.  their worth and value is found in who they are in Christ, not in how many young people they have brought before Christ!

I am so fortunate to have the same person investing in me over the last 21 years.  they are so valuable, and taught me a precious lesson as i started out.  “always have a teachable heart!”  I wonder how many of us have a teachable heart? A heart that is open to others speaking into it, and how much does the Church value those who are able to do this?  Investment is exactly that, an investment, for growth, for development, it is not a withdrawal, but an investment, and needs to be seen as such, understood as such, and appreciated/valued as such.

Andy Wilson heads up ‘Roll the Rock’ a christian youthwork organisation in Harrogate: Details here: http://rolltherock.org.uk/  They specialise in supporting, resourcing and investing in youth leaders and workers across Yorkshire. He can be contacted via andy@rolltherock.org.uk

A follow up question might be, is that churches might be keen to be investing in their young people by recruiting a youth leader, but at the same time, as Naomi Thompson suggests in her recent publication, this is indicative of a consumer mindset, in which they worker is just imported in to get on with it. Young people, according to her research, valued wider church involvement, in volunteering and participating and have mutual relationships. Without more involvement or investment beyond finances, churches stand accused of only economically valuing young people, and young people as consumers to be ‘entertained’ (Thompson, 2018, p191) I am hopeful that this is not always the case, i am also hopeful that there is more of an understanding about self care, about youthwork management, and supervision than there used to be. There is information on all of these issues on this site (see categories/menus). A challenge might be is that ‘efficiency’ might mean that employers of youthworkers might wait until its too late to put support in place- rather than think ahead..

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Author: James

Currently I work part time for both Frontier Youth Trust (www.fyt.org.uk) and Communities Together Durham (www.communitiestogetherdurham.org) and am also self employed and do various aspects of youthwork consultancy, including training, writing, lecturing, seminars and written pieces, including organisational consultancy, community profiling and detached/youthwork training. Please do get in touch if I can be of help to you in your church, project or organisation to develop your youth and community work. I have contributed to 'Here be Dragons (2013), and two recent articles in the youth and theology journal and 'ANVIL' the CMS online journal. My recent employment includes, working for FYT as a youthwork development adviser, being the centre director at Durham YFC, and before this I was known as 'Mr Sidewalk' as I was the project coordinator for the Sidewalk Project in Perth, where I facilitated the delivery of 5 years of detached youthwork on the streets, schools and communities to engage with young people , and support through alcohol misuse issues. In 2017 I completed an MA in Theology & Ministry at St John's College, Durham, and in 2008 graduated from ICC (now NTC Glasgow) with an honours degree in youth work with Applied theology.

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